The Effect of Cluster Position Determined by Vineyard Row Orientation on Grape Flavonoids and Aroma Profiles of Vitis vinifera L. cv. Cabernet Sauvignon and Italian Riesling in the North Foot of Tianshan Mountains

  • Hao-Cheng Lu
  • Xiao-Tong Gao
  • Chang-Qing Duan
  • Shu-De Li
  • Wu Chen
  • Jun Wang China Agricultural University

Abstract

Vineyard row orientation plays a critical role in determining cluster microclimate. This study aimed tofigure out how cluster positions determined by vineyard row orientation affect grape flavonoids and aromaprofiles of Cabernet Sauvignon and Italian Riesling grapes. Three cluster positions (two canopy sidesand the inner canopy) of NS and EW oriented row Cabernet Sauvignon and NS oriented row ItalianRiesling were selected for the experiment. Microclimate data was monitored around clusters from bothcanopy sides of different row orientations. The south canopy side had higher daytime temperaturesand PAR than the north canopy side in EW row orientation. Flavonoids of grape skins and seeds wereseparated and determined by LC-MS, and aroma compounds of grape must were determined by GC-MS.Results showed that flavanols were affected by orientations, and EW orientation had higher berries skinflavanol concentration than NS orientation. EW-IN berries had fewer glucuronide form flavonols and3’-hydroxylated flavonols than the other two positions in EW orientation. Inner canopy berries had lowerflavonol concentration than other positions in EW orientation of CS and NS orientation of IR. To aromas,C6/C9 were the main compounds significantly affected by row orientations. EW orientation berries hadhigher C6 alcohols concentration such as (E)-3-Hexen-1-ol, (E)-2-Hexen-1-ol and (Z)-3-Hexen-1-ol thanNS orientation, while NS orientation berries had higher C6 aldehyde concentrations such as Hexanal and(E)-2-hexenal than EW orientation. EW-IN berries had more abundant C6/C9 compounds than the othertwo positions. The study provided preliminary scientific evidence for vineyard viticulture practice andharvest strategy.

Author Biographies

Hao-Cheng Lu
Center for Viticulture and Enology, College of Food Science and Nutritional Engineering, China Agricultural University,  Beijing - Key Laboratory of Viticulture and Enology, Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs, Beijing
Xiao-Tong Gao
Center for Viticulture and Enology, College of Food Science and Nutritional Engineering, China Agricultural University,  Beijing - Key Laboratory of Viticulture and Enology, Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs, Beijing
Chang-Qing Duan
Center for Viticulture and Enology, College of Food Science and Nutritional Engineering, China Agricultural University,  Beijing - Key Laboratory of Viticulture and Enology, Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs, Beijing
Shu-De Li
CITIC Guoan Wine Co. Ltd, Manasi
Wu Chen
CITIC Guoan Wine Co. Ltd, Manasi
Jun Wang, China Agricultural University
Center for Viticulture and Enology, College of Food Science and Nutritional Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing - Key Laboratory of Viticulture and Enology, Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs, Beijing
Published
2021-04-16
Section
Articles