MEAT LABELLING AND THE PROTECTION OF RELIGIOUS CONSUMERS: A CRITICAL AND COMPARATIVE STUDY BETWEEN SOUTH AFRICA AND THE UNITED KINGDOM

Louise Rive

Abstract


During the first quarter of this year a horsemeat scandal severely compromised the reputation of a well-known supermarket chain in the United Kingdom (“UK”).  Shortly thereafter a similar scandal came to the fore in South Africa (“SA”).  After testing several meat products which were labelled as '100% pure beef mince' and 'beef biltong', traces of pork, donkey, water buffalo and in rare instances even giraffe, were found in products sold by several local supermarkets.  Despite food labelling legislation and regulations in both the UK and SA which attempt to afford consumers adequate protection, compliance therewith remains a problem in practice. The incorrect labelling of meat products in actual fact appears to have become an illicit trade for financial gain on a global level.  Simultaneously, consumers continue to be disappointed and their interests continue to be violated by means of fraudulent procedures.

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Copyright (c) 2019 Louise Rive

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